Neurodiversity Workshop

In our roles as faculty, staff, and administrators, we sometimes encounter people whose interaction style prompts us to consider whether they might be different in ways that warrant the label neurodivergent.* It is natural to wonder, "Should I ask about it? Will I hurt the person's feelings? Are there ways to improve our working relationship without asking about it?" This workshop will present strategies for interacting effectively with everyone, including those who may be neurodivergent.

The following speakers will make brief presentations, then invite discussion.

Speakers:

John Murphy, Chair, Division of Jazz Studies, whose contributions will be based on research with music students on the autism spectrum and current collaborative efforts to make the Division of Jazz Studies as inclusive and welcoming as possible.

Lauren Mathews, Senior Lecturer, Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, has worked with neurodivergent children and adults throughout her career as a speech-language pathologist.  She is currently co-advisor of Tuesday Nights Flights, UNT organization for neurodivergent students and developing UNT ENGAGE (Empowering Neurodiverse Groups in Academics and Gainful Employment).

Linda Holloway, Interim Dean, College of Health and Public Service, has had an extensive career as an advocate and researcher of supported employment, psychiatric rehabilitation and emergency preparedness for people with disabilities.  She is also co-advisor of Tuesday Nights Flights, UNT organization for neurodivergent students and developing UNT ENGAGE (Empowering Neurodiverse Groups in Academics and Gainful Employment).

Date: Monday, April 30, 2018

Time: 2:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Location: BLB, Rm.155

*Neurodiversity has been defined by Nick Walker as “the diversity of human brains and minds – the infinite variation in neurocognitive functioning within our species.” The term is used most often in the context of people on the autism spectrum, but it can also include conditions such as ADHD, dyslexia, Tourette's syndrome, anxiety, OCD, and depression. Neurodiversity is a property of populations. When the label is applied to an individual, the term neurodivergent is used.

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